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TTT#373 Educating for Democracy in the Digital Age - NWP Annual Meeting - Young Whan Choi, Jo Paraiso, Paul Oh - 11.21.13


81:21 minutes (55.86 MB)

This is a special episode of TTT, edited from a recording of a session at the National Writing Project's Annual Meeting in Boston on November 21, 2013. In addition to the presenters, listed below, we are joined by Johanna's amazing students and the thoughtful participants in this session.

Here's how we described this session:

B7: Educating for Democracy in the Digital Age

1:30pm - 3:00pm Hynes, Level 1, 104

How do we help youth understand the potential for writing to have impact, leveraging authentic purposes and today’s online platforms? How do we prepare youth to be informed, engaged civic actors—community ready, in other words—and not simply college and career ready? The National Writing Project is partnering with the Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) and the Civic Engagement Research Group at Mills College to undertake a district-wide effort called, "Educating for Democracy in the Digital Age." Join Paul Allison of the New York City Writing Project, and Jo Paraiso and Young Whan Choi of the OUSD, as they discuss—in person and virtually—a working partnership that leverages the Youth Voices platform as a means to support civic engagement in schools.

Presenter(s):
Paul Allison, New York City Writing Project 
Paul Oh, National Writing Project 
Johanna Paraiso, Oakland Unified School District 
Young Whan Choi, Oakland Unified School District 

On March 29, 2013 Paul Oh blogged in dComposing

What’s significant to me about the Educating for Democracy in the Digital Age effort, beyond its mission of youth civic engagement, is that OUSD teachers have taken on a great deal of the leadership – so there’s a grassroots, locally informed relevance to the work- and that it joins together in-school and out-of-school educational opportunities. Youth have gotten to work with nearby partners like KQED http://blogs.kqed.org/lowdown/ and far-flung partners like Youth Voices http://youthvoices.net. Ultimately, the hope is that all HS youth before they graduate will be able to engage in a capstone project that demonstrates the skill of issue analysis, the ability to take action, and a reflective stance. As one of my EDDA colleagues from OUSD, Young-Whan Choi, has said, we want our youth to come away from this educational opportunity – and their entire school career – not just college and career ready, but community ready. http://dcomposing.com/2013/03/29/educating-for-democracy-in-the-digital-age/

 

We are planning a follow-up TTT webcast with Young Whan Choi, Paul Oh, and teachers involved in "Educating for Democracy in the Digital Age" at 9PM Eastern/6PM Pacific on Wednesday, January 22, 2014. Please plan to join us at EdTechTalk/ttt http://edtechtalk.com/ttt

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #245 - Meet the New Youth Voices - An open meeting where we talk about the recent upgrade - 4.27.11


62:50 minutes (14.38 MB)

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, a group of us who are in the process of launching a new version of Youth Voices met to continue the process of building the technology and the pedegogy of our work together.

Youth Voices is a school-based social network that was started in 2003 by a group of National Writing Project teachers. We merged several earlier blogging projects, preferring to bring our students together in one site that would live beyond any particular class, where it would be easier for individual students to connect with other students, comment on each others work, and create multimedia posts for each other. Further we thought it made sense for us to pool our knowledge about curriculum and digital literacies. If being part of such a community makes sense to you, we invite you to join us too. We work to embrace any teacher who is interested to have their students publish online and participate in the give and take of a social network like Youth Voices.

Youth Voices is much more than a website or a social network. It is also a welcoming community of teachers who have been planning curriculum together for many years. In addition to being active members in our local Writing Projects and the National Writing Project, many of us also count ourselves as member of the World Bridges community, and we meet regularly via Skype on a weekly webcast/podcast, Teachers Teaching Teachers, which has been going live every Wednesday evening at EdTechTalk since 2006.

All of this collaboration and talk, these years of building curriculum and working on the web together have led to to consider: What do the Youth Voices/Teachers Teaching Teachers teachers love about this work? And why do we think any kindergarten - college teacher might also find to love there too? What we think you and your students will find on Youth Voices, what we keeps us coming back, what we strive to engender, what we will never give up on (even in a school) is involving our students in “authentic conversation.”

Over the years the teachers who have been working together to grow Youth Voices have learned that as important questions_bgas it is to have students publish multi-media, well-crafted products, it is at least as important to nurture, guide, and allow time for students to write comments and to develop conversations about each others discussion posts. Our mission at Youth Voices is to be a place online where students from across the nation (and globally, when possible) can engage other young people in conversations about real topics that they see happening in the world. We want our students to be immersed in lively, voiced give-and-take with their peers.

(For more, please read this resource at the National Writing Project's Digital Is site, "Authentic Conversations on Youth Voices.")

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #227 Why do we need print publications? 12.1.10


60:00 minutes (13.73 MB)

For six years now, we've been publishing, distributing, and discussing student work online at Youth Voices. Recently we've been talking with a group of students who are working collaboratively on producing magazines built out of the content on Youth Voices.

This show follow-ups from TTT #224 - Students and Rick West help us build community - 10.27.10. Chris Sloan described our publishing plans this way to the team of folks at MagCloud:

After many years of publishing our [Judge Memorial in Salt Lake City,Utah] high school newspaper locally on newsprint, my students just published their first school “newspaper” on MagCloud: http://www.magcloud.com/browse/Issue/128339 We just distributed the issue to the students yesterday, and everybody loves the new format. Just as exciting is the fact that a group of teachers from around the country who I collaborate with are also beginning the process of having our students publish a MagCloud photo magazine created by the digital photography group at youthvoices.net
 
We are delighted that Lauren Bernsen joined us to talk about using MagCloud in K-12 schools.

MagCloud’slaurenbernsen Marketing Maven: she’s our PR and Marketing guru… When Lauren is not designing our advertisements and collateral, she’s planning our events and trade shows and keeping our social calendar full. A former US-Sailing team member, a prolific chef and our in-house fashionista, Lauren works hard to keep MagCloud busy and looking good! (MagCloud)


Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #208 - Wondering about fossil fuel and enjoying the power of twitter in the NWP - 07.07.10


44:32 minutes (10.19 MB)

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, Alicia Blair, a science teacher who lives near the beach in Mississippi, asked us to think of her the next time we pump Fowl Language by Paul Jacksongasoline into a gas-guzzling automobile. Later in the show her heart went out to an art teacher, April Estep, who lives 20 minutes from the site of Massey Energy's Upper Big Branch mining disaster. Casey Daugherty, a co-director of the Ozarks Writing Project, observed, "We'll think of April every time we switch the lights on."

Sandwiched between these ongoing conversations about how to respond to the BP oil spill and similar disasters such as the Big Branch disaster, we talked about how to raise teacher voice and how to push out audio and video on social networks like Twitter.

This summer our guests brought twitter and social networking to and from their local Invitational Summer Institutes of the National Writing Project. Paul Oh leads us in this discussion of how the face-to-face, intense summer work widens when social networks become part of the mix.

Our guests on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers were:

Learn more from these folks and others on this recent NWP resource page, Tweeting in the Summer Institute and Beyond:

Writing Project teachers have found Twitter to be a serious learning tool. Many sites across the country integrated Twitter into their summer institutes this summer, and teachers have built "personal learning networks"—groups of people who casually join together to communicate and collaborate on common topics—where they discuss serious educational issues.


Story behind the image:

As an ornithologist’s son, watercolor artist Paul Jackson grew up spending Christmases in the park ranger’s cabin on Horn Island, Miss. Over several weeks, he turned his outrage into “Fowl Language,” in which a least tern, stilt, egret, cormorant and other Gulf birds sit atop a dropping-streaked BP sign as an oil rig smokes in the background.

He posted a photo of the painting on his Web site while the paper was still damp. Within two hours, it was selling as a T-shirt on the art-sale Web site Zazzle.com.

The Columbia, Mo., painter has since created his own site, “Art vs. Oil Spill.” About 100 artists from as far away as India and Malaysia have offered works, with all proceeds going to nonprofit groups working to clean up the oil or oiled animals.

Artists find ways to protest Gulf spill | Associated Press | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #189 - Reading and Writing in Kentuckiana: Paul Hankins and student talk about their Ning - 02.24.10


72:56 minutes (16.69 MB)

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, you will learn more about RAW INcK: Reading and Writing in Kentuckiana. Our guests were one site’s student managers, Tyler, along with their teacher, Paul W. Hankins, an English Teacher and Creator of RAW INcK. (Another student-manager of the Ning, Jin joined us in the chat room.) Paul is also a teacher-consultant with the Indiana University Southeast Writing Project and a State Representative to ALAN from Indiana. Listen to find out why we are excited to connect up with RAW INcK, “A Reading and Writing Community Hosted by the Juniors of Silver Creek High School [Indiana]. Now hosting members from all across America! Go INcK!”

Learn about how they set up chat sessions with authors like these:

  • Ellen Hopkins, author of Crank, Burned, Impulse, Glass, and Identical.
  • Chris Crutcher. Crutcher’s works include Athletic Shorts, Chinese Handcuffs, Deadline, The Sledding Hill, and King of the Mild Frontier.
  • Kimberly Willis Holt, author of When Zachary Beaver Came to Town, My Louisiana Sky, and a host of other YA titles.

 

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

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