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Teachers Teaching Teachers #189 - Reading and Writing in Kentuckiana: Paul Hankins and student talk about their Ning - 02.24.10


72:56 minutes (16.69 MB)

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, you will learn more about RAW INcK: Reading and Writing in Kentuckiana. Our guests were one site’s student managers, Tyler, along with their teacher, Paul W. Hankins, an English Teacher and Creator of RAW INcK. (Another student-manager of the Ning, Jin joined us in the chat room.) Paul is also a teacher-consultant with the Indiana University Southeast Writing Project and a State Representative to ALAN from Indiana. Listen to find out why we are excited to connect up with RAW INcK, “A Reading and Writing Community Hosted by the Juniors of Silver Creek High School [Indiana]. Now hosting members from all across America! Go INcK!”

Learn about how they set up chat sessions with authors like these:

  • Ellen Hopkins, author of Crank, Burned, Impulse, Glass, and Identical.
  • Chris Crutcher. Crutcher’s works include Athletic Shorts, Chinese Handcuffs, Deadline, The Sledding Hill, and King of the Mild Frontier.
  • Kimberly Willis Holt, author of When Zachary Beaver Came to Town, My Louisiana Sky, and a host of other YA titles.

 

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

21st Century Learning #118, Internet Safety 101


16:08 minutes (7.42 MB)

21st Century Learning #118
January 12, 2010
Internet Safety 101
 
A discussion about the how to speak about Internet Safety with parents and their kids.  Vinnie mentioned a danah boyd podcast that you can find here.  Lots of great links in the Chat Transcript too.  Enjoy!

<Chat Transcript>
 

Teachers Teaching Teachers #182 - A student-centered follow up: More on games, YouTube, Twitter, and Research - 01.13.10


60:12 minutes (13.78 MB)

On this week’s Teachers Teaching Teachers, we had some follow-up’s, and some room for new voices. Paul Allison invited several of his students from the East-West School of International Studies in Flushing, NY onto the show to explain more about gaming. These students were listening and in the chat room on TTT#181 the week before when we talked about gaming in schools with other teachers, researchers, and consultants. The student had asked for a student-centered follow up. Listen to find out where gaming is in their lives.

And stay tuned every Wednesday evening this Spring as Paul and Susan Ettenheim and other students learn about bringing gaming into their curriculum this coming semester. If you know of a gamer, please invite him or her to join us as well! We’d love to include other students via Skype!

And if that’s not enough, this week's podcast also includes George Haines, a 6th grade teacher back on the show to talk about a Twitter project he was about to launch. George was on TTT in August: Teachers Teaching Teachers #165 - 08.26.09 - Meet Lisa Dick and George Haines: Talking about research and diigo George has written us recently to say that he hasn’t given up on “video and self-directed learning via youtube."

I haven’t scrapped that platform yet, but I decided to try to use Twitter for self-directed learning first. It is so much more nimble of a platform, I figured it would allow for a more fluid discussion and more immediate feedback and clarification.I saw that you have a youthvoices account on twitter and I just started following it. My kids are almost ready to start tweeting out their questions and connecting to other kids as part of this “KidSourcing” project. My kids are 6th graders, but I have invited any classes in the ballpark to connect with my kids. We are connecting to kids in Tanzania (http://epicchangeblog.org/2009/10/21/the-twitterkids-of-tanzania/) and I am working out the involvement with schools in Peru, Brazil, China and a couple here in the old U.S. of A. I don’t know how neatly our project meshes with what you are trying to accomplish with Youth Voices, but I figured I would reach out and gauge  your interest in connecting.Here is the basic outline for the project: The idea is to have kids search for answers from the crowd of kids with no help from the adults (aside from monitoring and guiding offline).

The idea is to seek answers to “why” questions as opposed to “What” questions. For example, a question that a kid can simply Google like “when did the civil war start?” is a bad one, but a question like “WHY did the civil war start?” is a good one. Questions that start discussions, lead to independent research and sharing links fit the bill. The idea would be to keep it loose and low impact- not a heavily dependent collaboration. I will probably tell my kids to post a new question each week and I will probably give them an arbitrary number of questions from other kids to help answer.

For the first month we will work in depth on the project, then I hope to make it part of the routine when they come to the lab, meaning they login and check twitter for 5-10 minutes before we launch into whatever other projects we are doing at the time. video and self-directed learning via youtube.I haven’t scrapped that platform yet, but I decided to try to use Twitter for self-directed learning first. It is so much more nimble of a platform, I figured it would allow for a more fluid discussion and more immediate feedback and clarification.I saw that you have a Youth Voices account on twitter and I just started following it. My kids are almost ready to start tweeting out their questions and connecting to other kids as part of this “KidSourcing” project. My kids are 6th graders, but I have invited any classes in the ballpark to connect with my kids. We are connecting to kids in Tanzania (http://epicchangeblog.org/2009/10/21/the-twitterkids-of-tanzania/) and I am working out the involvement with schools in Peru, Brazil, China and a couple here in the old U.S. of A. I don’t know how neatly our project meshes with what you are trying to accomplish with youthvoices, but I figured I would reach out and gauge  your interest in connecting.

Click Read more to see a transcript of a chat that was happening during the webcast.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #179 - Radio Rookies Finding Where Their Passions Make Good Stories - 12.16.09


43:07 minutes (9.87 MB)

In this Teachers Teaching Teachers podcast, we welcome five students from the East-West School of International Studies and two radio producers, Sanda Htyte and Ann Heppermann. We wanted to learn more about the kinds of passionate, intelligent, well-researched radio programs that we hear on WNYC’s Radio Rookies.

This fall six of Paul Allison’s students at the East-West School of International Studies worked with Sanda Htyte and Ann Heppermann to produce radio programs (with images) for the Mapping Main Street project. This was the “Short Wave” program with WNYC’s Radio Rookies. All of these students (and one more from East-West) are now working on individual programs with Radio Rookies.

Radio Rookies Short Wave Mapping Main Street
Short Wave rookies embark on a mapping project to tell stories related to the Main Street in Queens, NY, as part of an ambitious project to map all the Main Streets in the United States. In the fall of 2009 the rookies collaborated with the mappingmainstreet.org project in a 5-week long intensive workshop, hosted by the Queens Teens program at the Queens Museum of Art. The students worked in groups reporting, taking photos, developing their stories, and above all working as a team to tell stories ranging from the cultural conversations of Main Street to steamed buns. View and listen here.

In this podcast, you'll learn more about creating projects for students that are personally meaningful and of interest to others. Learn how public radio producers help young people create high-quality audio documentaries. Enjoy this podcast about Radio Rookies and Mapping Main Street.

 

 

Click Read more to see a transcript of a chat that was happening during the webcast.

 

Teachers Teaching Teachers #161 - 07.29.09 - Summer Special: Submitting Your Own Docs Templates, Japan, and Digital Storytelling


37:38 minutes (12.28 MB)

"We squeezed three shows into one," Peggy George said in the chat room toward the end of the webcast. It's a summer special!

At the beginning of this podcast [0:44 - 18:52] Paul Allison and Susan Ettenheim talk to three Google managers and engineers about a new Docs feature: being able to upload our own templates. We were joined by:

  • Ronald Ho, a Google Docs Product Manager
  • Michael Thomas and Valerie Blechar, Google Docs Templates Engineers

Next up [18:53 - 29:29] are three people from The East-West School of International Studies (EWSIS), Ben Sherman, Principal. Paul Allison teaches English at EWSIS, and he is joined in the second part of this podcast by his colleague and two students who had just returned from a 10-day visit to Japan which was sponsored by Women Welcome Women World Wide:

  • David Bantz, Japanese Language teacher at EWSIS
  • Martha and Kwaku, Juniors at EWSIS

Finally we find some (although not nearly enough) time [29:30 - 36:21] to talk with Larry Newberger, Tech Liaison for the Ozarks Writing Project (OWP). Larry was excited to report on a 5-day OWP Advanced Institute on Digital Storytelling, "Trachers Traversing the Technology Highway," that he had just finished. Don't miss their teachers' Digital Stories and VoiceThreads.


Find more videos like this on OWP Advanced Institute

Click Read more to see a transcript of a chat that was happening during the webcast.
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