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Greg McVerry

TTT#386 Celebrating Open Education Week 2014 w/ Karen Fasimpaur, Verena Roberts, Greg McVerry, Ian O'Bryne, Nate Otto 3.12.14


65:12 minutes (44.77 MB)

On this episode of TTT we celebrate Open Education Week 2014 http://www.openeducationweek.org/ with:

We talk about open learning and open educational resources in K-12 education. We discuss the benefits and challenges of open resources, such as the new K-12 OER Community of Practice, http://www.k12opened.com/community/ and how online spaces like this and others might be used to support educators in opening up their practice.

K-12 Open Educational Resources Community of Practice from Karen Fasimpaur on Vimeo.

 


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast,
and to find links to several of the resources shared during this episode of TTT.

TTT#367 Why Open Matters When We Share Curriculum - Connected Educator Month Series (2 of 5) 10.9.13


59:14 minutes (40.67 MB)

On this episode of TTT, recorded on 10.9.13 as part of our series of Connected Educator Month http://connectededucators.org shows, we explore why open matters when we share curriculum.

We are joined by:

Greg Mcverry's profile photo Greg McVerry Christina Cantrill's profile photo Christina Cantrill Johanna Paraiso's profile photo Johanna Paraiso
Karen Fasimpaur's profile photo Karen Fasimpaur Joann Boettcher's profile photo Joann Boettcher Sheri Edwards's profile photo Sheri Edwards

Here's a Digital Is http://digitalis.nwp.org/ resource on this topic, written by one of our frequent (and always welcomed) guests on TTT, Karen Fasimpaur:

Why does "open" matter?

Creative Commons Licence

There is a lot of talk about "open" these days. It's the new black. It's cool and hip, and marketeers are calling their products "open," whether they are or not.

But what does "open" really mean? And why should we care?

For the purposes of this discussion, "open" refers to content that can be remixed, modified, and redistributed by anyone.

There's an endless supply of free content on the Internet. How is open different from everything else that is free? In the United States, any content that is not public domain (by virtue of its age or designation as such by the creator) is copyrighted, whether or not it is indicated as such. Subject to certain excpeptions such as fair use, the copyright owner has exclusive rights to reproduce, prepare derivatives, and distribute the copyrighted work (section 107 of the copyright law).*

Open-licensed content, though, can be reused and redistributed without prior permission.

The most common open licenses are those provided by Creative Commons. An attachment below summarizes the various licenses and gives more info about open resources.

As educators, why should we care about open? Some of the reasons include economics, remixability, and promoting a culture of sharing. We'll explore each of these in the chapters that follow.

BROWSE THIS RESOURCE

- See more at: http://digitalis.nwp.org/resource/3837#sthash.ewnNpvyc.dpuf


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast.


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