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Zac Chase

Teachers Teaching Teachers #270 - Education Beyond Borders with Noble Kelly, Kimberly Brown, Ian Roberts, and Zac Chase 11.2.11


60:34 minutes (13.86 MB) plus.google
On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers we are joined by Noble Kelly, founder and president of Education Beyond Borders as well as three EBBers:

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Teachers Teaching Teachers 253 Chris Lehmann, Bud Hunt, Diana Laufenberg, Zac Chase, Matt VanKouwenberg, Larissa Pahomov 6.29.11


46:30 minutes (10.64 MB)

There were many wonderful moments at ISTE this year! One of them was the closing keynote by Chris Lehmann, principal of the Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Philadelphia. That evening we invited Chris, Bud Hunt, and four teachers from SLA -- Diana Laufenberg, Zac Chase, Matt VanKouwenberg, and  Larissa Pahomov -- to join us at Rembrandt's Restaurant (aka SLA North) to reflect on ISTE and whatever else they wanted to talk about.

Enjoy the SLA students and Chris Lehmann's speech in this video, check out his reflections, and listen to our conversation. Enjoy!

Chris Lehmann's ISTE Keynote - Process and Impressions: I gave the closing keynote at ISTE on Wednesday, and it was a really wonderful experience. It's an amazing thing to get up in front of 5,000 plus people and talk about what you deeply believe. It was particularly hard for two reasons - one, the ISTE community is as close to a "home-base" outside of SLA that I have in the world of education. There are so many people - too numerous to mention here - who have been friends, co-learners, mentors, sounding boards over the past six years that to speak in front of all of them in one place was both exhilarating and a little intimidating... and many of them had heard me speak at other events, so finding something new for that segment of the audience was a real challenge. But the real reason it was so hard to craft this speech was because I was preceded by my students. (Read the rest of this post on Practical Theory - A View from the Classroom.

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #241 - Why we love the National Writing Project and why Federal funding is important - 3.30.11


59:58 minutes (27.45 MB)

Several leaders in the National Writing Project--Paul Oh, Elyse Eidman-Aadahl, and Troy Hicks--joined us from Washington DC where they were working to lobby members of Congress today, Thursday, March 31.

Also Chad Sansing, Zac Chase, and Andrea Zellner joined us on the Skype conversation--as well as many friends in the chat. Chad has been organizing a blogging effort going on around the country.  Here’s what he is asking supporters of the NWP to do:
Please add your voice to the chorus of educators from around the country who are blogging in support of the NWP. We’re trying to accumulate 1,000 blog posts by April 8, when the next Continuing Resolution for the federal budget expires. There are already nearly 150 posts - moving stories of the impact of the NWP on the lives of teachers and students - at the archive: http://coopcatalyst.wordpress.com/2011/03/15/the-blog4nwp-archive/ You can tweet or email your blog post URL to Chad Sansing (twitter: @chadsansing; email: csansing@gmail.com) who has been organizing this effort, or post it to this discussion and we’ll make sure it gets added to the archive. Remember to try to tag your posts with: #blog4nwp. FYI, we’ve gotten a few responses on twitter to this effort from the press office of the Department of Education (see: http://www.andrea-zellner.com/archives/629 and http://aetweets.wordpress.com/2011/03/25/blog4nwp-and-being-bossy/), so let’s keep it up! Check out what folks have written to get an idea of what you might add but more importantly take a few minutes to add your story (stories).

Listen to find out what we can do to help restore funding to the National Writing Project. Then find your own ways to add your voice the the the chorus singing praises to the National Writing Project!

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #236 How place can set the table for inquiry, with ideas from Alaska, Louisiana, and Philly 02.16.11


57:56 minutes (13.26 MB)

Talking about their own versions of place-based education, our guests on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers are:

  • Diana Laufenberg, Zac Chase, and a student, Luna from the Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia
  • Woody Woodgate from Alaska
  • David Pulling from Louisiana State University at Eunice

We asked Diana and Zac to come talk about an interdisciplinary project they did/are doing with juniors. Each student was invited to find a building in his/her neighborhood with a name on it, then to learn the history of that person and the building. From there, students created multimedia presentations. Diana and Zac brought this example to their conversation at last month’s Educon 2.3, and we wanted to learn more! Wait until you see this work!

David writes:

Many in my semester’s class have joined Voices on the Gulf since a couple of weeks ago, and Wednesday I’m going to give them a prompt for their first post. I’m going to start them off the same way I did the class last fall, asking them to study their back yards or neighborhoods or pastures or homes to identify some place or thing that they may take for granted and to consider the cost of losing it, etc. etc. etc. I’ll encourage them to post pix or videos as well. I’ll guide them into inquiry from there.  I hope you’ll hear from some neat students and read some neat stuff.  I’ve got an eager and industrious bunch this semester.

Also check out David’s post: Setting the table for Inquiry: Where I find myself (almost) a year after Deep Water Horizon.

If that’s not enough, our old friend from Alaska, Woody will be joining us as well. Woody has focused a lot of his scholarship and pedagogy around place-based education in rural Alaska. We have already learned a lot from him, and we look forward to re-connecting with him on Wednesday. Woody writes:

I am negotiating to go back out to rural Alaska to teach at a site that is heavily focused on what they call “relevant education” and what we have been calling place-based education.  I will be focusing on how to incorporate standards into the already established outdoor program.   Therefore, I gladly accept your invitation in hopes that I can get back up to speed with what others have been doing in this area in the last 3 years since I have been out of the classroom trenches.

Pretty exciting stuff! We hope you enjoy learning with us.


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EdTechWeekly #181


61:19 minutes (28.07 MB)

January 23, 2011

(podcast uploaded from an airplane ... a first for EdTechTalk?)

Regular hosts: Dave, Jen, John

Guest hosts:


This week's topics of conversation:

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