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Diana Laufenberg

TTT#351 Teachers Speaking Up w/ Jesse Hagopian, Diana Laufenberg, José Vilson, Steven Zemelman, Pat Delaney, Maribeth Whitehouse


65:56 minutes (45.27 MB)

We invite you to consider how you might speak up a bit more, tell your stories as a teacher, and assert your leadership. On this week's episode of TTT (recorded 5/29/13), we talk about how, when, why, and where to speak up! We discuss how teachers become leaders by loosing fear, speaking up, telling their stories, and taking collective action. Join us for the next installment of a series of shows about teachers speaking up on Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 9PM ET/6PM PT.

Our guests on this episode are:

Jesse Hagpian, Diana Laufenberg, Jose Vilson, Steve Zemelman, Patrick Delaney, Maribeth Whitehouse

Jesse Hagopian's profile photo Diana Laufenberg's profile photo Jose Vilson's profile photo Steven Zemelman's profile photo Patrick Delaney's profile photo Maribeth Whitehouse's profile photo

Jesse Hagopian, a high school history teacher and union representative at Garfield High School who refused to administer the MAP standardized test in January. Recently, the school district backed down, announcing that the Measures of Academic Progress, or MAP test, is now optional for high schools. http://iamaneducator.com/ | https://twitter.com/JessedHagopian. Jesse is a public high school teacher in Seattle and a founding member of Social Equality Educators (SEE). He is a contributing author to Education and Capitalism: Struggles for Learning and Liberation and 101 Changemakers: Rebels and Radicals Who Changed US History (Haymarket Books). Hagopian serves on the Board of Directors of Maha-Lilo—“Many Hands, Light Load”—a Haiti solidarity organization.

Diana Laufenberg describes herself as a farm kid turned Science Leadership Academy teache, now taking a year to consult, travel and learn. http://laufenberg.wordpress.com/ | https://twitter.com/dlaufenberg. She has taught all grade levels from 7-12 in Social Studies and she has most recently been a teacher with the Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia, an inquiry-driven, project-based high school focused on modern learning. Diana's practice has deep roots in experiential education, taking students from the classroom to the real world and back again. Before finding her way to Philadelphia, she was an active member of the teaching community in Flagstaff, AZ where she was named Technology Teacher of the Year for Arizona and a member of the Governor’s Master Teacher Corps. Recently Diana was featured on TED.com for the “How to Learn? From Mistakes” talk and recognized for earning National Board Certification. Her publications include a featured piece on the New York Times Learning blog, co-authoring a chapter in an educational leadership book, an upcoming article in the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy and regular contributions to teachinghistory.org.

José Luis Vilson is a math educator for a middle school in the Inwood / Washington Heights neighborhood of New York, NY. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Syracuse University and a master’s degree in mathematics education from the City College of New York. He’s also a committed writer, activist, web designer, and father. He co-authored the book Teaching 2030: What We Must Do For Our Students and Public Schools … Now and In The Future with Dr. Barnett Berry and 11 other accomplished teachers. He currently serves as the president emeritus of the Latino Alumni Network of Syracuse University, as a board member on the Board of Directors for the Center for Teaching Quality, and has been a part of the Acentos Foundation, LATinos In Social Media (LATISM), the Capicu Poetry Group, BlogCritics, and the AfroSpear.He writes for Edutopia, GOOD, and TransformED / Future of Teaching, and has written for CNN.com, Education Week, Huffington Post, and El Diario / La Prensa NY. He has also spoken at TEDxNYED and the Save Our Schools March.- See more at: http://thejosevilson.com/about/#sthash.VTpt98UX.dpuf

Steven Zemelman, one of the conveners of http://teachersspeakup.com/ and much more. Steve directs the Illinois Writing Project, and works to build long-term sustainability of school improvement. He works on literacy, whole-school development, and teacher leadership. With several partners he has written numerous professional texts, including the latest edition of Best Practice now subtitled Bringing Standards to Life in America’s Classrooms; plus 13 Steps to Teacher Empowerment: Taking a More Active Role in Your School Community; Content Area Writing: Every Teacher’s Guide; Subjects Matter: Every Teacher’s Guide to Content Area Reading; Rethinking High School; History Comes Home: Family Stories Across the Curriculum; and A Community of Writers: Teaching Composition in the Junior and Senior High School. Formerly he directed the Center for City Schools at National-Louis University.

Patrick Delaney is a recently retired librarian from Galileo Academy of Science and Technology in San Francisco. He has been a Bay Area Writing Project (CA) teacher-consultant for decades, and has been a leader in technology work in the National Writing Project. Pat has been a mentor and a friend of educational bloggers and collective teacher voice for many years. Here's where to find him now: Weeding the Collection.

Maribeth Whitehouse is a special education teacher at IS 190 in the Bronx. She is in her ninth year of teaching eighth grade. She is a teacher-leader in Lehman College's Mathematics Teacher Transfromation Institutes. Maribeth publishes under a few different pseudonymns as well as under her own name, for example: "Measuring My Value" | https://plus.google.com/117378500106053922800/posts

Related Episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers: TTT #287 Losing fear with Steve Hargadon, Anne Simonen, Maribeth Whitehouse, Delia Downing, Chad Sansing, Mary Beth Hertz 3.7.12


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Teachers Teaching Teachers 253 Chris Lehmann, Bud Hunt, Diana Laufenberg, Zac Chase, Matt VanKouwenberg, Larissa Pahomov 6.29.11


46:30 minutes (10.64 MB)

There were many wonderful moments at ISTE this year! One of them was the closing keynote by Chris Lehmann, principal of the Science Leadership Academy (SLA) in Philadelphia. That evening we invited Chris, Bud Hunt, and four teachers from SLA -- Diana Laufenberg, Zac Chase, Matt VanKouwenberg, and  Larissa Pahomov -- to join us at Rembrandt's Restaurant (aka SLA North) to reflect on ISTE and whatever else they wanted to talk about.

Enjoy the SLA students and Chris Lehmann's speech in this video, check out his reflections, and listen to our conversation. Enjoy!

Chris Lehmann's ISTE Keynote - Process and Impressions: I gave the closing keynote at ISTE on Wednesday, and it was a really wonderful experience. It's an amazing thing to get up in front of 5,000 plus people and talk about what you deeply believe. It was particularly hard for two reasons - one, the ISTE community is as close to a "home-base" outside of SLA that I have in the world of education. There are so many people - too numerous to mention here - who have been friends, co-learners, mentors, sounding boards over the past six years that to speak in front of all of them in one place was both exhilarating and a little intimidating... and many of them had heard me speak at other events, so finding something new for that segment of the audience was a real challenge. But the real reason it was so hard to craft this speech was because I was preceded by my students. (Read the rest of this post on Practical Theory - A View from the Classroom.

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #236 How place can set the table for inquiry, with ideas from Alaska, Louisiana, and Philly 02.16.11


57:56 minutes (13.26 MB)

Talking about their own versions of place-based education, our guests on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers are:

  • Diana Laufenberg, Zac Chase, and a student, Luna from the Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia
  • Woody Woodgate from Alaska
  • David Pulling from Louisiana State University at Eunice

We asked Diana and Zac to come talk about an interdisciplinary project they did/are doing with juniors. Each student was invited to find a building in his/her neighborhood with a name on it, then to learn the history of that person and the building. From there, students created multimedia presentations. Diana and Zac brought this example to their conversation at last month’s Educon 2.3, and we wanted to learn more! Wait until you see this work!

David writes:

Many in my semester’s class have joined Voices on the Gulf since a couple of weeks ago, and Wednesday I’m going to give them a prompt for their first post. I’m going to start them off the same way I did the class last fall, asking them to study their back yards or neighborhoods or pastures or homes to identify some place or thing that they may take for granted and to consider the cost of losing it, etc. etc. etc. I’ll encourage them to post pix or videos as well. I’ll guide them into inquiry from there.  I hope you’ll hear from some neat students and read some neat stuff.  I’ve got an eager and industrious bunch this semester.

Also check out David’s post: Setting the table for Inquiry: Where I find myself (almost) a year after Deep Water Horizon.

If that’s not enough, our old friend from Alaska, Woody will be joining us as well. Woody has focused a lot of his scholarship and pedagogy around place-based education in rural Alaska. We have already learned a lot from him, and we look forward to re-connecting with him on Wednesday. Woody writes:

I am negotiating to go back out to rural Alaska to teach at a site that is heavily focused on what they call “relevant education” and what we have been calling place-based education.  I will be focusing on how to incorporate standards into the already established outdoor program.   Therefore, I gladly accept your invitation in hopes that I can get back up to speed with what others have been doing in this area in the last 3 years since I have been out of the classroom trenches.

Pretty exciting stuff! We hope you enjoy learning with us.


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EdTechWeekly #168


49:05 minutes (22.48 MB)

EdTechWeekly #168 

September 19, 2010

Guest Host: Diana Laufenberg, Science Leadership Academy

Dave, John, and Jen welcome guest host Diana Laufenberg to continue the new format for EdTechWeekly that offers a deeper look into a smaller number of topics each week. This week, the discussion focuses on the following topics:

Join us for next week's guest: Camilla Elliot, Teacher/Librarian from Melbourne, Australia.

Wiki Agenda

Chat log below

Teachers Teaching Teachers #212 - A community of teachers building "Voices on the Gulf" - 08.04.10


41:26 minutes (9.48 MB)

As you will hear on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, we are very excited about the new website, http://voicesonthegulf.org ! On this podcast we are joined by:

We are putting together a team to help us to develop this site — and fast. We've set up the following Community Managers:

David Pulling (Louisiana) - Site Manager
Paul Allison (New York) - Site Manager

Catherine Tibbs (Mississippi) - Art and Humanities
Ellen Steigman (Louisiana) - Art and Humanities
Susan Ettenheim (New York) - Art and Humanities

Paige Baggett (Alabama) - Community and Culture
Suzie Boss (Oregon) - Community and Culture

Jeff Mason (Florida) - Health and Wellness
Andrea Zellner (Michigan) - Health and Wellness

Natasha Whitton (Louisiana) - Money and Careers
Chris Sloan (Utah) - Money and Careers

Alicia Blair (Mississippi) - Nature and the Environment
Matt Montagne (California) - Nature and the Environment

Kyle Meador (Louisiana) - Social Issues and Human Rights
Diana Laufenberg (Pennsylvania) - Social Issues and Human Rights

Stacey Ferguson (Mississippi) - Our Space (K-6)
Margaret Simon (Louisiana) - Our Space (K-6)
Gail Desler (California) -  Our Space (K-6)
Kevin Hodgson (Massachusetts) - Our Space (K-6)

Along with this growing group of National Writing Project teachers, teachers from along the Gulf Coast, teachers in Edutopia’s pblcmp, AND/OR teachers involved with the EdTechTalk/WorldBridges community, we have been organizing (and working with Bill Fitzgerald at FunnyMonkey) to build this site that will do the following:

  1. Provide a place where we can collect, amplify, and engage the poems, stories, and essays that students along the Gulf Coast bring to their teachers this month, as schools open.
  2. Layer these stories, poems, and essays with online sources, including news releases and poetry (such as the poems on Poets for Living Waters).
  3. We don’t know yet! Many of us have been working for some time on building a site like Voices on the Gulf, and we have some idea what directions this will take, AND we want to allow the discussions on the site to help us know how to develop.

The most important item, above is #1 - we are working as fast and hard as possible to get the site out to teachers, and for it to be easy to use. If you would like to add a poem, thought, or anything, please sign up, then once you’ve been made into a member, you’ll see the Add Discussion button. Please go in and write a brief reflection, add  photo, a video, or almost anything — just to see how easy it is to do. AGAIN, THANKS!

Students have been coming back the past couple of weeks in many Gulf Coast schools. A lot of our connections with teachers on the Gulf have happened this summer on a live webcast that we do every Wednesday evening. You may have already been on the show. We would love it if you would come back. We’ve been able to make a lot of invaluable connections. You can see what we mean here: http://edtechtalk.com/teachersteachingteachers

We would love to invite you to join us on Teachers Teaching Teachers every Wednesday at 6:00 p.m. Pacific / 8:00 p.m. Central / 9:00 p.m. Eastern. If you use Skype, please email Paul Allison or Susan Ettenheim and let us know your Skype name (again)— just helps us to know who to look for! We hope that you will be able to join us soon on a Wednesday evening.

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