Robert Squires

Instructional-Design-Live #25 Is Online Learning Better?

Community College Research Center

This week on IDLive, Shanna Smith-Jaggars discusses her response to the US Dept. of Education's report on online learning. Widely cited as proof that online learning is better, the DOE study fails to address some of the broader implications of online learning. Dr. Jaggars addresses these issues and many more--a must listen.

In May 2009, the US Department of Education issued a meta-analysis and review of online learning studies that compared face-to-face, blended and online delivery modes, and found that: On average, students in online learning conditions performed better than those receiving face-to-face instruction.” Despite the caveats identified in the research, the conclusion, for some, was still: Online learning is better!ShannaShanna Smith-Jaggars, Senior Research Associate at the Community Colleges Research Center challenges this assertion in her response to the meta-analysis  (July 2010). Jaggars more fully explores the comparison of online and face-to-face instruction and finds only 7 studies out of 51 can be used to shed light on this question. Of these 7, Jaggars concludes that there is no significant difference between learning outcome achievement in face-to-face or online courses for certain student populations. Sound familiar? Time to channel our energies into more rewarding directions, perhaps.. As Jaggars puts it in this interesting interview, “what we really need to be doing is spending more time and effort in trying to figure out what are the most effective instructional practices in both modalities”

Instructional-Design-Live #24 AECT Research Symposium Papers

AECTJennifer Maddrell and Robert Squires discuss several of the papers being considered this week at the  Association for Educational Communications and Technology Research Symposium  In Bloomington, Indiana. Papers being presented at the symposium are freely available on the AECT website. Look for shows that follow-up with authors in the near future.

In a slight departure from our traditional format, we discuss several research papers that are being presented ataect the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Research Symposium being held in Bloomington, Indiana from July 20 - July 23. Jennifer Maddrell, presenting on the influence of Backchannel Communication on Cognitive Load, discusses her paper and several others in this 30 minute discussion.

Instructional-Design-Live#22 2010-06-18 E-Portfolios

Helen Barrett

Dr. Helen Barrett, former faculty at the University of Alaska, Anchorage has spent nearly a decade investigating the use e-portfolios for enhancing stduent learning. In this show, she lays it on the line: e-portfolios that are designed as summative 'showcases' of achievement are missing an opportunity to have students focus on substantive learning.

Dr. Helen Barrett, recipient of the EIFEL lifetime achievement award for her contributions to e-portfolio research and development, joins us this week to put a firm emphasis on having students control their learning through e-portfolios. In addition to highlighting the ‘two faces of e-portfolios’, Helen makes the case that universities have been placing too great an emphasis on e-portfolios for summative learning. 

 

Instructional-Design-Live#21 2010-06-11 Revisiting Cognitive Overload

stroop test

 

Arlene Walker-Andrews, Associate Provost and Psychology Professor at the University of Montana, discusses how cognitive capacitiesand the ability to attend to information need not be considered as limited. In other words, cognitive overload need not exist. This suggests interesting implications for the design of instruction that is both scaffolded and learner-centered. Some great analogies and resources.

Stroop Test

Having recently discussed the need to avoid cognitive overload in online courses, we take a step back to consider whether or not cognitive overload is actually an issue. As Arlene Walker-Andrews, Associate Provost and Psychology Professor at the University of Montana, points out: “I do not believe that attention and cognitive capacities are limited. In my view, attention shouldn’t be considered a finite resource, rather it should be characterized as “attending,” which suggests flexible, skilled action. Recent theories about attention suggest that although not all stimuli are analyzed, nonattended stimuli are not all filtered out and their impact on learning and memory will vary depending on relevance and/or personal experience.” Great stuff!

Join Arlene and the ID team this week to listen to what this means for individualizing the learning experience and tailoring instructional strategies to the cognitive abilities of learners.

 

 

Avaliable on the Web

Arlene's Notes for the Discussion

 

Chat Transcipt: Jun 11, 2010 10:05:22 AM - IDL 21: COGNITIVE OVERLOAD 'REVISITED'
 
 

Instructional-Design-Live#20 2010-06-04 The LMS and Learning

I hate Blackboard

Join the ID live team this week as we discuss the practical implications of using a centralized Learning Management System to manage the online learning experienece. The position of Jon Mott and David Wiley is discussed: http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cgi-bin/showfile.exe?CISOROOT=/IR&CISOPTR=7...

Mott and Wiley Quote

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