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Susan Ettenheim

Teachers Teaching Teachers #233 - Bud Hunt and Gail Desler on citing sources, loving Audacity and more - 1.26.11


48:20 minutes (11.06 MB)

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, Paul Allison, Susan Ettenheim, and Chris Sloan catch up with two other National Writing Project teachers, Bud Hunt and Gail Desler.

First we talk to Bud about his conversation at this year EduCon 2.3.  We encourage you to follow the links at the bottom of this description from the EduCon site (I hope we did our "linktrubition" correctly here!):

Dr. Remix; or how I learned to stop worrying and love citation
Browse recordings: livestream.com/educon8
Who: Bud Hunt, St. Vrain Valley School District (CO) and Joe Bires, Haddonfield School District (NJ)
Conversation Description:
     This presentation is an extension of a Twitter conversation in response to a keynote presentation at ISTE 2010. One presenter felt that he was witnessing an act of plagiarism, while the other felt he was seeing remix in action. Their constructive disagreement is worth further exploration.
Clearly, there are many differing views on the role of proper use of the work of others. What is the place of citation in the work we are doing with students and others? When should you cite? How? What does a digital citation, or "linktribution" as Alan Levine calls it, look like online?
     Perhaps you never thought about it or perhaps you never considered the issue in its totality. This discussion will raise your awareness of this issue that fundamentally affects us because ideas are at the core of all of our curricula. Through citation, we ask students to connect ideas together and create new ones, but the issue of citation masks the fundamental question of the relationship between ideas and their creators.
Websites:  http://www.budtheteacher.com - http://edtechleadership.com - http://bit.ly/drremix

Next up in the podcast, Gail Desler brings us up to date on here work as a technology integrator in the Elk Grove (CA) Unified School District.  Among other things, Gail describes why she loves Audacity so much, and here's some of how she puts it in her wonderful Edublog, BlogWalker:

     The appeal of  Audacity to students is that they can edit all or just parts of a recording. For the past few months, I’ve had the privilege of observing Teresa Cheung’s 4th graders delve into Audacity to edit their Stories from Heart audio interviews. Once students see how easy it is to zoom in and delete an “er” or “um,” or shorten a pause, or amplify a section that’s too low, or remove background noise, etc., they become active sound editors. I love watching the confidence level of ELLs grow, as they relax, knowing how easy it is to redo words or even a single word until they’re satisfied with the output.
     But more importantly, as Teresa’s students listen, for instance, to Chase’s mother explain how she came to be born by a waterfall, or Devina’s grandmother talk about growing up in Berkeley in the ’50s, or Anthony’s mother talk about her childhood days escaping Laos,  the students take pride in sharing and preserving family stories, cultures, and languages. As the collection builds, so does the celebration of common threads and diversity in Ms. Cheung’s classroom, along with an appreciation for the power of the human voice.

Finally, Paul, Chris, and Susan mull over some of the changes they are planning for Youth Voices. Within days of this post, Bill Fitzgerald and the other "primates" over at FunnyMonkey will have finished a re-launch of Youth Voices on their new Voice Box installation.

The VoiceBox installation profile is designed to simplify the work of groups looking to create or expand their online presence. Groups who could use this site range from media organizations to not-for-profits to schools to advocacy groups. If an organization wants to build a place for their stakeholders to publish, interact, and get more informed, then VoiceBox could support that work.

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #232 - Skype in the Classroom with George Mayo and Brianna Reynaud - 1.19.11

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62:19 minutes (14.26 MB)

Skype is trying something new, and we wanted to find out what it’s all about. Do you use Skype in your classroom—or have considered it? Then you might enjoy this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers.

We were intrigued when we saw “Skype in the classroom: A free directory that connects teachers and helps them use Skype to enrich students’ educational experience.”

me2.jpg?width=183&height=183&crop=1%3A1
When we saw that George Mayo was involved, we asked him to come explain what the project is trying to do.  As he explained:

I was one of many teachers Skype talked with. They are basically trying to set up a network for teachers who are using, or want to use Skype in their classrooms. The site is still in Beta I believe. It’s a great idea. I can also talk about how we just recently used Skype for our documentary project in my middle school classroom. We were able to Skype in and record about 15 different experts in different topics for our 18 different documentaries we are currently making. It would be interesting to hear what other teachers are doing with Skype. 

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We were also joined on this podcast by Brianna Reynaud. As the Senior PR Manager for Skype in the Americas, Ms. Reynaud works “with media, bloggers and other organizations to spread the word about Skype across the region.” To get a sense of Brianna, check out a few of her recent twitter posts:

And check this out: Elie Wiesel, David Axelrod, and special guests talk politics via Skype at the Conference of Nobel Laureates at 92Y.

Enjoy this conversation with old and new friends of Skype!

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #231 - What does passionate inquiry look like at a charter school in rural Oregon? 1.12.11


60:47 minutes (13.91 MB)

We are delighted to introduce you to Travis Powell on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers. Travis is a member of the Oregon Writing Project, and he teaches at a unique school that he Photoon20100901at12.473_2.jpg?width=183&height=183&crop=1%3A1co-founded, the Child’s Way Charter School in Oregon.

We met Travis at a gaming workshop at the National Writing Project’s annual meeting in November and at a NWP Maker workshop.

Here’s what Travis says about his school and his work there:

The charter is in its fifth year of operation. The charter's mission is to create environments that allow the students to explore and discover their strengths and weaknesses in their educational development. We have an emphasis on the implementation of technology. I am a co-founder of the charter and my role was and is the implementation of some of the theories on education put forth by Gardner, Glasser, Dewy, Maslow & Payne ... I serve a low SES population of 24 students ranging in grades from 9th -12th. Each student has a laptop with internet access along with ipad touches on loan form CATE, center for advanced technology in education, out of the University of Oregon.

The class has done some short videos on our ning.

www.cwcharter.ning.com

The ning showcases some of their individual and group projects. In "Problems have Solutions" the students learned what it takes to solve the Cube and then construct a machine to solve the cube. Another project is "Solar Hydrogen" part II.

My goal is to get the students to realize the potential. Be able to read, write, think abstractly (mathematics), apply the scientific method, and communicate effectively at a college level by the time they leave the charter. In tandem, develop a four year plan post high school (two-year, four-year college, vocational, ...) with clear objectives with feedback on accomplishing those steps....

Enjoy!

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Teachers Teaching Teahers #230 - What does passionate inquiry look like at a second-chance school in Canarsie, Brooklyn? 1.5.11


56:18 minutes (12.89 MB)

Last year, shortly after participating in a 3-week Summer Advanced Institute at the New York City Writing Project, our guest on this podcast, Charlie Freij helped found the East Brooklyn Community High School, Canarsie, NYC, USA.

His students have been using Youth Voices more and more. If you are interested to have your students on Youth Voices — or curious — you should enjoy this podcast.

Check out Charlie’s students’ work here. We’ll also got an update on his school’s program to include online classes.


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Teachers Teaching Teachers #229 - How do we become more effective online educators--for students and other teachers? 12.15.10


64:55 minutes (14.86 MB)

If you wanted to talk about online education, who better would you like to sit down with than these four educators:

pe-davecormierDave Cormier

Photo_on_2011-12-28_at_13.48__2_reasonably_smallAndrea Zellner

main-thumb-434715-100-sN3LK0iSEklBVhLiOZyNYZ8t4Yu60KG8Fred Haas

Zac Chase zac_chase





That's what Susan Ettenheim and Paul Allison had the privilege of doing on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers. Enjoy!

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.
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