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     I have read many conceptions about instructional technology, maybe today, I should say ‘educational technology’, form the early definition to the AECT’s definition in 2005. The most one I can accept is the 2005 definition. Although it is also a temporary one, a snapshot in time, it is clear, precise and unambiguous and draw boundaries indicating what is included, what is excluded, what is central, and what is peripheral. Especially the word ‘appropriate’, it is used accurately. You know, different class need different educational technology.

But it has a shortcoming. That is, there is no evaluation in the concept. Evaluation is very important to learning. Educational technology should have evaluation as feedback to learning.

 

   ?Educational technology is the study and ethical practice of facilitating learning and improving performance by creating, using, and managing appropriate technological processes and resources (Molenda and Robinson, 2004)

 

    My idea about 2005 definition is above. Looking forward to different ideas!

Educational Technology

I believe that it is important as teachers to incorporate educational technology in the classroom, even thought there is no clear cut way to evaluate it. Yes evaluation is very important to learning but what does it mean if you are a child that does not meet the standards? Does that mean that child is dumb or incompetent? In my opinion no, it just means that we are expecting the same standards out of every child and ultimately the same results. Why do I think we have evaluations? I think we have them so that we can make a fair standard of grading but what is fair if every child learns different and the standards are set to a certain style of learners? Education technology allows us to reach each and every child, based on their learning style, so there is no clear way to evaluate them based on one standard.

Evaluating educational technology

In my opinion, evaluating educational technology is to know what difference technology can make in terms of teaching and learning. The answer for this question leads educators to decide what technology work and what does not in terms of the performance of students and teachers in the classroom. The importance of formative evaluation of performance gives the educators the opportunity and the ability to improve their future planned activities and their future methods of implementing technologies in the classroom..

Source: “Educational Technology Evaluation Design” http://www.sun-associates.com/eval/evalprop.html

Ranyah

That is, Learning Needs Assessment, Indeed

Evaluation, that's what I thought over more and more educational technologies these years, we know, the virtual teachers might totally forget this significant step when implementing online education.

I totally agree with the enhancement on learning performance, and just refer to the article Online Training Needs Assessments: How to Measure Learning Performance Effortlessly. I think we can get the best approach to the right learning with better educational technologies.

William Peterson

ed tech

i agree with u about how evalutation needs to be apart of educational technology. If i was to come up with my own def. it would be "Educational technology is the study of learning how to integrate technology into a class room while improving students performance in the class room."

latest educational technology

For the latest educational technology, I think some presentation software can help more.

E-learning

I totally agree with the statement you made that, "Evaluation is very important to learning."  I am currently completing a course in my Masters Program and in the first module I have read a number of advantages and disadvantages of e-learning.  While the literature presents many arguements for and against there is very little mention of evaluation.  In teaching we have to be cognizant of teaching and assessing outcomes.  The same should apply with technology.  It is difficullt to promote and sell technology to traditional teachers when they ask if it improves student performance and you have no clear evidence that it does.

 

e-learning

Stephen, I agree with you that in teaching we have to be cognizant of teaching and assessing outcomes.  Numerous courses have a standardized test at the end, and if the outcomes have not been taught, or tested, then achievement on such test will be low.  Unless technology has proven to be effective, I know I would be reluctant to introduce it into my classroom.  I don't feel there is time to teach the curriculum and experiment with different methods of teaching or teaching tools.In the literature I have read, there has not been a convincing argument that technology enhances learning.  In some studies it appears to have a positive effect of achievement, however in others, it appears to make no significant difference.  It is difficult, at least for me, to promote and sell technology to other teachers when I am not totally convinced of any improvement in student performance.  

Regardless of the evidence, students today are definitely using technology in education.  I thought this video was very interesting.

 

Importance of Evaluating E-Learnings Effect on Achievement

Great video tgrandy. It really brings some kind of perspective to the degree to which modern students are immersed in the world of information technology while their education remains entrenched in traditional designs. It seems obvious that when a society is so versed in digital literacies and social technologies, that the field of education should embrace those technologies, not simply as a teaching tool, but as a requirement for educating literate productive citizens in a modern era. However, with that said, it is prudent to point out, as you have, that as educators operating in a world of acccountability, we must be able to justify the effectiveness of educational technologies in improving student achievement. Larry Cuban has authored or co-authored several works outlining this very problem. An excerpt of one of his works "Oversold and Underused" can be found at http://www.hup.harvard.edu/pdf/ CUBBLA_excerpt.pdf . Cuban has pointed out the dilemma facing educators that very little data supports any claims that the massive investments into computer technologies for schools has had any measurable effect on student achievement. And, eventhough it is quite obvious that social technology is a major player in the lives of the modern student there may in fact be little evidence to support the potential benefits of integration of such technology with respect to gains in achievement. I am in no way suggesting that we should abandon the use of these tools in our classrooms but if we are to continue to receive the required funding to support technology integration, I feel we will need some convincing data pointing to the effectiveness of such integration.

Trevor

e-learning

Hey Stephen and TGrandy,

I agree that today's youth are using technology at a rate never before experienced. We as educators must accept that learners today are a part of a new generation that function in a technological rich society where technological media is at the center of their everyday lives. An increasing proportion of these learners are ‘digital natives’ whose thought processes, socialization and engagement with ICT tools differs radically from that of previous generations. Fouts (2000) points out that the majority of schools in America are not equipped to meet the needs of this emerging technological advanced generation. Should the efforts of educators and institutions turn towards e-learning environments? Some experts suggest that the ubiquitous nature of social software enable learning to take place, anywhere, any time, and at any pace. Is this the future of education as we know it?

Glen

e-learning

Hey Stephen and TGrandy,

I agree that today's youth are using technology at a rate never before experienced. We as educators must accept that learners today are a part of a new generation that function in a technological rich society where technological media is at the center of their everyday lives. An increasing proportion of these learners are ‘digital natives’ whose thought processes, socialization and engagement with ICT tools differs radically from that of previous generations. Fouts (2000) points out that the majority of schools in America are not equipped to meet the needs of this emerging technological advanced generation. Should the efforts of educators and institutions turn towards e-learning environments? Some experts suggest that the ubiquitous nature of social software enable learning to take place, anywhere, any time, and at any pace. Is this the future of education as we know it?

Glen